Badminton is a racquet sport played by either two opposing players or two opposing pairs (doubles), who take positions on opposite halves of a rectangular court that is divided by a net. Players score points by striking a shuttle with their racquet so that it passes over the net and lands in their opponents’ half of the court. Each side may only strike the shuttle once before it passes over the net. A rally ends once the shuttle has struck the floor.

1. Rules for the game of badminton for the Alberta 55 Plus Games or any sanctioned ALBERTA 55 PLUS event shall follow the rules as prepared by Badminton Canada. The full set of rules can be obtained by contacting Badminton Alberta at 403 297- 2722 or searching for the “Laws of Badminton” at www.badminton.ca or by contacting:

Badminton Alberta
60 Patterson Blvd SW,
Calgary, AB T3H 2E1
Tel: (403) 297-2722
Fax: (403) 297-2706
E-mail: info@badmintonalberta.ca

2. Age groups and events for an Alberta 55 Plus Games will be specified in the current Activity Information Book.

3. The shuttle of choice may depend on the level of competition. The shuttles used at most competitions and that are recommended are nylon green-band shuttles. If a shuttle different from this is to be used in a Provincial competition, 6 months notices should be given to all zones so they can adapt accordingly.

4. Tournament Tie-Breaker:

  • If a two-way tie occurs among those eligible for medals, an extra medal match will be played between the tied players.
  • If a three-way tie occurs, a coin toss will determine who-plays-who in extra matches to determine the medal order. Note: if three are tied, one pair will receive a “bye” in the first match.

Simplified Laws of Badminton:

A. The court The court is 13.4 m long by 6.1 m wide. The net in the centre of the court is 1.55 m high and 6.5 m wide. The service area for doubles is wide and short – the boundaries are the outside width line and the line that is 0.76m in front of the back boundary for length. The playing area for doubles is wide and long – the entire area within the outermost lines of the court.

badminton-court

B. Toss The winner of the toss can elect to serve or receive in the first game, or to choose to play at a particular end of the court. The loser of the toss makes the remaining choice.

C. Basic Aim Rally Point Rules are to be used in all games. You win a rally if you hit the shuttle over the net and onto the floor of the opposing side’s court, see courts layout above. If a shuttle lands on the line, it is considered “in”.

You lose the rally if you fail to hit the shuttle when it is dropped from your hand to serve, or if you hit the shuttle into the net, or over the net, but outside the opposing side’s court. You also lose the rally if, for example, the shuttle touches you or your clothing, or if you hit it before it crosses the net.

D. Serving (Doubles) The server and receiver stand in the diagonally opposite service courts (always right hand at the start of the game). After service, players may move anywhere on their side of the net. The server must obey laws designed to force underhand delivery of the serve, and the receiver must stand still until the service is struck. If the serving team loses the point, the service goes to the other team.

A player of the serving side shall serve from the right service court when the serving side has not scored or has scored an even number of points in that game. Therefore, at the beginning of the game, the server starts from the right court.

A player of the serving side shall serve from the left service court when the serving side has scored an odd number of points in that game.

The player of the receiving side who served last shall stay in the same service court from where he served last. The reverse pattern shall apply to the receiver’s partner.

The player of the receiving side standing in the diagonally opposite service court to the server shall be the receiver. The players shall not change their respective service courts until they win a point when their side is serving.

badmonton-service

Types of Serve
There are two ways to serve: the Forehand method and the Backhand method.
– For the Forehand, your palm and respective ‘front face’ of the racket are held to the side of your body. The shuttle is held in the opposite hand and dropped to be hit. The racket must contact the shuttle below the server’s waist at the first instant of contact.
– For the Backhand, the racket is held across your body, with your palm facing inwards. The respective ‘back face’ of the racket must contact the shuttle below the server’s waist at the first instant of contact.
– Over hand serves are NOT permitted. The racket head must be discernibly below the racket hand upon initial contact.

badmonton-forehand-backhand

E. Scoring
If the serving side wins a rally, the serving side shall score a point. The server shall then serve again from the alternate service court. If the receiving side wins a rally, the receiving side shall score a point. The receiving side shall then become the new serving side. A match shall consist of the best of three games. To win a game, you must score 21 points (and be ahead by at least 2 points). If the score becomes 20-20, the game continues until one side wins by 2 points. If the score becomes 29-29, the side scoring the 30th point shall win that game. The side winning a game shall serve first in the next game.

F. Changing Ends
Players change ends at the end of game 1 and game 2. In the third games, when one team reaches a score of 11, the side change ends.